Visit our Partner, Bear Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY

Visit Our Appliance Repair Partners in the Bensonhurst region of Brooklyn, NY

Bear Appliance Repair

Appliance Repair Experts in Brooklyn, NY and serving Queens, Manhattan and Staten Island

Choosing appliances to furnish a home can be expensive and time consuming for any homeowner. When a new homeowner purchases a new home they normally want all new appliances when they move in. From new kitchen ovens to new washing machines, they want the whole treatment. Even though a brand new appliance decision is an excellent move, it may the best one for those who can afford it. In some situations, all new appliances may not be possible unless the owner of the home wants to incur a lot of debt when they are moving in. Therefore, it is important for each individual owner to assess his or her financial circumstances before going forward. If they can afford the new appliances with ease, this will be their decision.

Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY

Fortunately, all new appliances are not always the best option, especially if the homeowner had good quality appliances in their previous homes. While some people may not take good care of the appliances that have, others are great at ensuring they call companies like Bear Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY into their homes.

These companies can help the owners to ensure the appliances are repaired right and have the proper maintenance performed on schedule. For instance, Bear Appliance Repair can be called in for regular maintenance and repairs for all of the appliances in the kitchen area as well as other areas of the home. All of the maintenance can be performed in one setting, especially if the homeowner knows how to develop a plan that will work for both the company and the owner of the home. On the other hand, if they have appliances in most areas of the home, the appliance repair technicians may want to break the repair jobs up and perform them on different days and time. This will allow the employees in the company to do a good maintenance and repair job with each individual appliance that is in the home.

If these jobs are done too quickly or these professionals are rushed to complete every appliance at one time, these professionals may not have the time allotments to provide their best quality services.

With regular appliance maintenance, the homeowner will not have to be concerned about buying new appliances when they move into a new home, especially because the appliances that they are already have are kept in mint condition. Therefore, when the appliance repair professionals come into the home, their main objective is to make sure the maintenance and repairs include cleaning the parts that cause performance problems and energy to be loss. For example, when the homeowner contacts the appliance repair Brooklyn staff for air conditioner maintenance services, one of their main jobs is to prepare the air conditioning systems for the winter prior to season. While performing their duties, they will have to clean the filters and other areas of the central air conditioning systems thoroughly. The cleaning they do will help these systems to run efficiently throughout the winter without causing problems for the owner of the home.

Reviewing Warranties

In addition to ensuring regular maintenance is done, the owner of the home should also review their records for warranties on the appliances that they have acquired. If the owner has not moved from one location to another for long and extended periods of time, the warranties for the appliances may be expired. On the other hand, if the owner of the new home moves frequently, the appliances that they have acquired may still be under a manufacturer’s warranty. Therefore, the owner may want to keep the appliances that they have from the previous home because they can replace the appliance instead of fixing it. This is based, however, on the terms of the initial appliance contract.

Brooklyn Appliance repair Hot Lines

When an owner chooses to replace some of their appliances with newer ones, they should review all of the terms listed in the contracts. For those manufactures who want to obtain an edge over the competitors, there are different kinds of incentives and perks for buying the products that they offer. For instance, some manufactures offer their appliances with a variety of different benefits including an outstanding service hotline.

These hotlines are attractive for those buyers that do not like to risks the quality of their appliances with repair people from other repair companies. In fact, these owners prefer the best appliance repair services possible. This means they want services from a representative of the company that manufactures and sells the appliance that they possess. When the manufacturer of their appliance supplies a hotline that they can call for repairs and regular maintenance, they are usually more likely to purchase this brand of appliance from the companies that sell them.

Purchasing OEM Parts for Major Appliances

Another key factor in purchasing appliances from the original manufacture is the quality of their parts offered. The types of parts offered are known as OEM or original equipment manufacturer parts. Even though most consumers may not know the different, others are aware of differences. Therefore, they prefer the original equipment manufacturer parts to ‘after market’ parts. While some repairman may say some aftermarket parts are equivalent to the original equipment of the manufacturer, this not always true. These facts or statements are dependent upon the manufacturer and the part that they are referencing. For instance, some car repairman will replace the OEM parts with aftermarket parts because the insurance company will not pay for the original equipment manufacturer part.

One of the main reasons for this decision is the premium amount that would have to be paid. In order to save money, insurance companies and repair shops will install these parts with or without the consumer’s approval. However, if the car owner wants to pursue or contests the issue, the customer can install the OEM parts but they will have to pay the difference between the OEM part and the aftermarket part. With this being said, most people who have a choice will often choose the OEM part instead.

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Congregant rescues scrolls from synagogue blaze

Sea Gate:

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

Talk about chutzpah!

A congregant of a Sea Gate synagogue heroically dashed into a raging fire to rescue the Torah at the house of worship was gutted by flames on April 13. The act was a clear mitzva, said the brave devotee.

“The Torahs had to be saved. That’s the bottom line,” said Howie Londner, who has been a congregant at the synagogue for years. “All we got out were the scrolls, but that was the most important thing — that’s what keeps us going.”

The blaze ignited the Congregation Kneses Israel of Sea Gate on Nautilus Avenue just after midnight and ripped through the shul’s roof during the holy week of Passover, according to a fire department spokesman.

Rabbi Chaim Brikman arrived on the scene shortly after the fire started and barreled into the synagogue for the Sifrei Torah, but the last of the eight scrolls was stowed away in a safe. And by the time Londner made it over with the combination, the house of worship was engulfed in thick, black smoke, he said. But that didn’t stop him from braving the flames to save the last sacred scroll.

“It was black — I couldn’t see two feet in front of me — but I know the shul, so I was able to make my way through,” said Londner. “I didn’t think about it. I just ran in.”

It took Londner ten tries to open the safe as charred wooden beams and hunks of the ceiling came crashing down around him. But he made it out relatively unscathed, though he was treated at Coney Island Hospital fro smoke inhalation.

But to hear Londner tell it, he’s not the hero of the story.

“Listen, God protected me,” he said. “When I came out, people were crying hysterically, and I said, ‘It wasn’t that bad.’ ”

Londner is a devout regular at the shul now, but it wasn’t always that way. He had strayed from the flock for a time, but after an accident, Rabbi Brikman stopped by to check up on Londner in the hospital. It was a touching moment that pushed him to become an active congregant.

“They’re very good people,” he said. “This is a shul for everybody.”

Rescuing the scrolls was a big win, but the real battle will be rebuilding. The congregation has already made plans to temporarily meet at the Rabbi’s house and another building near the charred house of worship.

“We made it through Sandy — we were praying with no light and heat for weeks,” Londner said. “We’ll need help, and then of course we pray to god and hope we could rebuild.”

It was unclear what started the blaze. A fire department investigation is ongoing, officials said.

To help the shul rebuild, you can donate to the synagogue’s Matchathon page at https://matchathon.com/matchathon?campaign_id=351

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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It’s a Mitzvah! Volunteers deliver Passover fare to local families

Brighton Beach:

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

How con-seder-ate!

Hundreds of people that might not have been able to have matzoh for Passover opened their doors to welcome food baskets filled with a whole lotta matzoh and other staple holiday fare — all packaged and delivered by organizations in Marine Park, Brighton Beach, and Coney Island — before the eight-day holiday began. And one of the volunteers was happy to be helping those in the elderly community celebrate the holiday, said Mara Goldshtein, who packaged foods with the Be Proud Foundation in Brighton Beach on April 6.

“The event was excellent, beautiful. It is very nice very that the community thinks about elderly people who need to celebrate the Passover,” said Goldshtein. “I was very proud to be a part of this event.”

And this year, the Be Proud Foundation went all out by stuffing the nearly 550 packages with gefilte fish, matzoh balls, and chocolate-covered matzoh — almost everything needed to fill the seder table, said founder Raisa Chernina, who thanked all the volunteers.

“Absolutely incredible. People were so happy because this year we gave very good packages — not good, very good,” she said. “First time we give gefilte fish, it’s a little expensive.”

And over in Marine Park, more than 100 volunteers came out to the Marine Park Jewish Center on April 2 to pack together boxes of fruits and vegetables — and of course the unleavened bread — for local families. It was a meaningful experience to be able to hand deliver the food right to families’ doorsteps so they didn’t have to come out for it themselves, said the center’s founder.

“It was amazing. Staple items you can’t go wrong with, also special kosher for Passover matzoh and kosher for Passover cookies,” said Shea Rubenstein. “One of the beautiful things about this type of food pantry, we don’t allow the people in need to show up for their grocery order. That extra step delivering — that person’s dignity is more important than the food itself.”

Another Marine Park volunteer, who attended with his family, said there’s no better feeling than helping out your own neighbors.

“It was a beautiful outpouring of support for our community,” said Mark Plotsker.

Volunteers from the Shorefront Jewish Community Council in Brighton Beach and the Jewish Community Council of Greater Coney Island also packaged and delivered more than 1,000 boxes of Passover food.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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Police search for Sunset Park gunman

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

Police are searching for a gun-toting goon and his blade-wielding buddy who attacked two men in Sunset Park on April 10.

An argument between the duo and two victims at an Eighth Avenue business near 58th Street escalated at 9:40 pm when one of the baddies pulled out a silver handgun.

The gunman tried to fire a round at a 21-year-old man, but the weapon jammed, footage released by police shows.

The brute’s accomplice slashed another man with a sharp object before both attackers fled on foot, said officials.

Police describe the gunman in his 20s with black hair. He was last seen wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, a dark jacket, and a white T-shirt with dark pants and dark shoes.

His partner was also described as in his 20s with black hair and was last seen wearing a blue hooded jacket with tan pants and sneakers, officials said.

Police ask anyone with information about crime to call (800) 577–8477, submit tips at www.nypdcrimestoppers.com, or text 274637 followed by TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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Nordic pageant crowns new ‘Miss Norway’

Dyker Heights:

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

Call them striking vikings!

Eight Scandinavian beauties competed for the crown in the 62nd-annual Miss Norway of Greater New York Contest at the Norwegian Christian Home in Dyker Heights on April 8. But the pageant is less about beauty, and more about celebrating the Norwegian heritage of community-minded contestants, said the new Miss Norway.

“It’s definitely more than a beauty pageant,” said New Jersey resident Kristen Johnson, a 21-year-old Rutgers University student. “It’s about celebrating our Norwegian heritage and the contributions we make to our community. I’m happy that I can represent that.”

A panel of five judges listened to a three-minute speech from each contestant about her interests and her Norwegian identity. Johnson, who is a senior at Rutgers, already has a job lined up at the New Jersey Department of Agriculture and discussed how she aims to help the state’s planters sustain their crops, and the next generation of farmers.

“Right now I’m trying to help increase young farmers in the state and help farmers’ crops become viable,” she said.

Miss Norway will return to South Brooklyn for her duties during the Norwegian parade in May.

“I’m excited to represent my culture,” said Johnson.

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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Bay Ridge Nights knows its rights!

Bay Ridge Nights:

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

Stick it to the Man, Bay Ridge!

The hub of Brooklyn night life is swapping pints for protests this week. And whether you are red, blue, or purple, there are plenty of opportunities to make your voice heard.

But first, get into the spirit of social rebellion on Saturday with some ’60s rock from local cover band Out of the Blue, at all-American bar Red, White, and Brew (8910 Fifth Ave. between 89th and 90th streets) at 4 pm. Then keep the party — and the nod to the past — going at No Quarter with classic rock cover band Time Warp at 9 pm.

Then start your crusade for a better world on Tuesday — the deadline day for filing your taxes — by heading to the Peace Action Bay Ridge protest of military spending at the Fort Hamilton Post Office (8801 Fifth Ave. between 88th and 89th streets). If you are fed-up with your hard-earned tax dollars going to anything other than filling up the moon-sized craters on Shore Road, this is the venue to vent your frustrations. The rally gets going at 8:30 am and will taper off at noon.

Once you have revved up your civically-engaged-engine, arm yourself with know-how at a tenant rights workshop put on by Fight Back Bay Ridge at the Fourth Avenue Presbyterian Church (6753 Fourth Ave. between Senator and 68th streets) on Tuesday at 6:30 pm. Learn about rent stabilization, senior citizen rent increase exceptions, how to file a housing complaint, and more. Come with questions for reps from the Metropolitan Council of Housing to get the most out of the night.

And on Wednesday, engage with your neighbors at the “NY 11 Town Hall” at the Bay Ridge Manor (476 76th St. between Fourth and Fifth avenues) for residents of New York’s 11th congressional district, which includes Southern Brooklyn and Staten Island. The 7:30 pm gathering will feature experts from nearly a dozen local and city-wide groups discussing education, health care, immigration, and more — although it will not feature Congressman Dan Donovan, who prefers an electronic town hall to appearing in public.

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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The hunt is on in Marine Park!

Marine Park:

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

These kids had an egg-cellent time!

Hundreds of kids took off to hunt for colorful Easter eggs in Marine Park on April 8. One of the smaller youngsters stayed clear of the stampede of kids searching high and low for the brightly colored eggs, but still had a blast, and even managed to snag a few herself, said mom Jennifer Fox who helped her 17-month-old daughter.

“She got a few eggs. She had the most fun watching everybody run,” said Fox. “I was with her so she was able to keep up with me. We went to the part where there weren’t any kids running and that’s where we wound up finding all our eggs.”

The hunt, hosted by state Sen. Marty Golden (R–Marine Park), is a great event for all the kids who live in the neighborhood, said Fox.

“We appreciate that that’s something that goes on for the community,” she said.

And a group of three friends — who came ready with bunny ears atop their heads — had the most fun taking pictures with the real, fluffy-tailed deal, said another Marine Park mom.

“It was good, it’s just fun hanging out with the kids in general,” said Amy Suen. “They took some pictures with the bunny, so they really liked that.”

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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[BAY RIDGE] What the truck?!? New sanitation trucks leave Bay Ridge streets littered with junk

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

They just can’t get enough junk in the trunk.

The city must rework how it collects large junk from Bay Ridge and Dyker Heights streets because the Department of Sanitation’s new garbage trucks have less space to cram in hulking waste, according to locals.

Mattresses, furniture, and other large items are piling up curbside because the area’s new trucks are split between trash and organics. Now an extra truck swings by occasionally to collect the leftovers, but workers miss items that are then left to fester for weeks. The new procedure is just one big mess, said a community leader.

“The problem is the system in place is not effective,” said Josphine Beckmann, district manager of Community Board 10. “We’re getting a ton of complaints about items that have been missed for weeks. Before this, we had no complaints about missed bulk pick up, now we have so many.”

The Department of Sanitation rolled out the so called “dual bin trucks” in October 2016, which are divided into two compartments — one for trash and the other for biodegradables — as part of the city’s organics collection program, where residents haul bins packed with food scraps and yard waste to the curb for pick up, according to a Sanitation spokeswoman.

But the trucks’ split trash compactor means the garbage side fills up faster and makes it more difficult to crunch what the city calls “bulk” items — anything bigger than four feet by three feet — and things get left behind, according to Beckmann. The result is a hodgepodge of junk littering the streets until a truck with the specific purpose of picking up bulk comes by. And that only happens if workers remember to fill out a form logging the rubbish and pass it along to a supervisor, according to an agency spokeswoman.

From October 2016 to March 2017, 311 logged nearly 300 complaints for missed bulk collection — compared to zero for the same period the year before, according to city data. But tossing a bookcase or a boudoir isn’t an everyday occurrence, so the city doesn’t think locals should be making such a stink, said an agency spokeswoman.

“It’s not every day that you’re throwing out a couch or a mattress,” said Belinda Mager. “Most of the time the dual bin truck will collect everything. Generally a single truck can manage.”

But locals beg to differ, and say the problem is only getting worse, according to one Ridgite who schlepped his mattress to the curb multiple times for pick up — but with no luck.

“I’ve hauled out my mattress twice so far and both times it was ignored,” said Bay Ridgite Gabriel Vaduva, who has lived on Gatling Place for the last six years. “It’s covered up and meets all [the city’s] requirements, but nobody picks it up. And I know I’m not alone — I see sofas and La-Z-Boys all over the place. They better do something, because it’s trash city out here.”

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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[MIDWOOD] Another bomb threat against Brooklyn Jewish center

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

Someone texted in a bomb threat to a Midwood Jewish center on March 10, prompting an evacuation of the Coney Island Avenue building around 8 am, just one day after the Jewish Children’s Museum in Crown Heights received its own emailed bomb threat. Both threats were unfounded, but rattled nerves nonetheless.

Police responded to the Jewish Association Serving the Aging at 8:05 am after someone working for the agency got a text that a bomb would go off, officials said. Police would not go into more detail about who received the text or what else it said.

Officers searched and cleared the building between Foster Avenue and Avenue H, and deemed it safe for everyone to go back inside by 10:22 am, a police department spokesman said.

Police are investigating the incident and its ties to the handful of other threats made against Jewish centers around the city, a department spokesman said.

But locals are not so much cringing in fear as they are in fuming frustration — and are hoping the stream of unfounded threats is not a disturbed plot to “cry wolf” enough to bring everyone’s guard down, said photographer Simon Gifter, who was on the scene.

“There’s no fear. The sense I got from interviewing people, they are sick and tired, not even scared anymore. They are just fed up with the whole situation. That’s the mindset of a lot of people, ‘another stupid bomb threat,’” said Gifter. “But what if people start letting their guard down? They are in a bind, have to take it seriously because if they don’t and something happens.”

Officials believe the scares are all coming from one sick copycat with sophisticated technology to disguise himself — after Missourian Juan Thompson was arrested last week for numerous threats across the county.

One local pol took to social media to lament the relentless stream threats coming day after day.

Elder Care Expo

“It seems that hardly a day goes by without a threat to an innocent Jewish institution. Elderly people threatened today, children yesterday,” Assemblyman Dov Hikind (D–Midwood) wrote on Facebook. “With all of the resources that are allegedly being dedicated to identifying the culprits and bringing them to justice, why has there only been one arrest? The current theory is that it’s one individual making these threats. So why can’t he be stopped?”

And now Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is leading the charge with a letter to the Department of Homeland Security demanding it increase federal funding to ensure the security and protection of religious institutions across the country on the heels of the growing number of bomb threats this year. The letter, signed by 18 senators from both sides of the aisle, cites the recent scares at many Jewish centers.

The need for protection is imperative and the federal government must recognize the severity of what’s going on, said Gillibrand.

“New Yorkers shouldn’t have to live or worship in fear,” she said. “Hate crimes and threats are on the rise and we can’t stand idly by and do nothing, or pretend it’s not happening. Now more than ever, we need to make sure our places of worship and community centers have the right resources to protect themselves. I’m asking the Trump administration to take these threats seriously and dedicate more federal dollars to protecting religious and community centers.”

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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[GERRITSEN BEACH] Driver hits and kills Gerritsen Beach woman

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

A driver struck and killed Gerritsen Beach resident Carmen Santacruz just steps from her Gerritsen Avenue home on March 7, police said.

The 55-year-old driver was heading toward Lois Avenue in his 2016 red Ford pickup truck when he struck 69-year-old Santacruz between Whitney Avenue and Avenue W at about 6:20 pm, according to authorities. Santacruz was crossing the neighborhood’s main thoroughfare towards Veterans Memorial Way, right across from her house in the middle of the block, when the driver struck her, police said.

Emergency responders arrived at the scene and found her unconscious and unresponsive, and transported her to Coney Island Hospital, where she then died, a police department spokesman said.

The driver remained at the scene — he was not intoxicated and does not have a suspended license, the spokesman said.

The city’s Collision Investigation Squad is investigating the accident, police said.

Locals have pushed for more traffic lights along Gerritsen Avenue after a drunk driver hit and killed 17-year-old Sean Ryan, who was riding his bike in the middle of the street near Florence Avenue on July 17.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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[BENSONHURST] Grave concerns: Controversy over toppled headstones in Jewish cemetery

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

They cast the first tombstone.

Local pols rushed to hold a press conference at Mapleton’s Washington Cemetery on March 5 to decry 42 toppled tombstones as an act of vandalism, but officials at the largely Jewish cemetery — whom the pols didn’t consult — say the headstones simply fell over because of age and the elements.

Now cemetery officials are blaming the politicians for sowing fear without doing their homework.

“These politicians rushed to judgement that it’s vandalism,” said Micheal Ciamaga, the manager of the Bay Parkway burial ground. “If they would have contacted us and waited, we could have wrapped this up easily with them. Some of the older stones are unstable and fall over. It’s not vandalism.”

Assemblyman Dov Hikind (D–Borough Park) led a press conference with Councilman David Greenfield (D–Midwood), and community leaders on the fallen grave markers after a local who regularly strolls the grounds on the Sabbath noticed the stones and alerted officials after sundown. Pols consulted with police, who had begun investigating the matter, but broadcast their concerns before speaking with managers at the cemetery, according to Hikind who tweeted “#Antisemitism” with a picture of an overturned headstone Sunday morning.

Police have since determined that the fallen headstones were not toppled by vandals, said a detective.

“There isn’t any evidence that it’s vandalism. It seems like it was a result of long-term neglect,” said Detective Ahmed Nasser. “The case status is still open, however, based on speaking with the manager of the cemetery, it seems the stones fell as a result of long-term neglect and the environment.”

But Hikind and community leaders continue to insist that it’s no coincidence that dozens of tombstones in the same section of the graveyard are down. They point to a break in the barbed wire on the six-foot fence near 20th Avenue and 57th Street that bounds the cemetery as a sign that something more is going on. Some stones may be falling because of neglect, but local pols still suspect foul play, said Hikind.

“Those tombstones that the cemetery said were lying down, those are not the ones we are talking about. I’m aware of those. The issue is that in this one section of the cemetery you have all these tombstones that look like they were tampered with,” said Hikind. “I don’t believe it was the wind that blew them down — that’s ridiculous. Someone cut the fence to get into the cemetery — quiet obviously. Something is not kosher here.”

Washington Cemetery is no strangers to desecration. In 2010, vandals scrawled graffiti on 200 tombstones and pushed them over. And news of the disturbed stones comes after vandals targeted a series of Jewish cemeteries in upstate New York, Pennsylvania, and Missouri.

But Washington Cemetery’s manger says family members are responsible for maintaining the headstones and at times they go uncared for. If workers spot a downed stone they set it upright. But in the winter it’s harder for workers to keep up with raising downed stones because the sprawling cemetery lacks its seasonal staff, and it may be a while before workers even notice the toppled stones, according to Ciamaga.

Nevertheless community leaders remain skeptical and demand an in-depth investigation before dismissing the act.

“I believe that it’s a strong possibility that it was vandalism, and I would like a thorough investigation,” said Barry Spitzer, Community Board 12’s district manager. “What we’ve called for is an investigation, and I don’t think this is creating fear. We need a thorough investigation because if it was vandalism, then a very serve and grave crime was committed here.”

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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