Visit our Partner, Bear Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY

Visit Our Appliance Repair Partners in the Bensonhurst region of Brooklyn, NY

Bear Appliance Repair

Appliance Repair Experts in Brooklyn, NY and serving Queens, Manhattan and Staten Island

Choosing appliances to furnish a home can be expensive and time consuming for any homeowner. When a new homeowner purchases a new home they normally want all new appliances when they move in. From new kitchen ovens to new washing machines, they want the whole treatment. Even though a brand new appliance decision is an excellent move, it may the best one for those who can afford it. In some situations, all new appliances may not be possible unless the owner of the home wants to incur a lot of debt when they are moving in. Therefore, it is important for each individual owner to assess his or her financial circumstances before going forward. If they can afford the new appliances with ease, this will be their decision.

Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY

Fortunately, all new appliances are not always the best option, especially if the homeowner had good quality appliances in their previous homes. While some people may not take good care of the appliances that have, others are great at ensuring they call companies like Bear Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY into their homes.

These companies can help the owners to ensure the appliances are repaired right and have the proper maintenance performed on schedule. For instance, Bear Appliance Repair can be called in for regular maintenance and repairs for all of the appliances in the kitchen area as well as other areas of the home. All of the maintenance can be performed in one setting, especially if the homeowner knows how to develop a plan that will work for both the company and the owner of the home. On the other hand, if they have appliances in most areas of the home, the appliance repair technicians may want to break the repair jobs up and perform them on different days and time. This will allow the employees in the company to do a good maintenance and repair job with each individual appliance that is in the home.

If these jobs are done too quickly or these professionals are rushed to complete every appliance at one time, these professionals may not have the time allotments to provide their best quality services.

With regular appliance maintenance, the homeowner will not have to be concerned about buying new appliances when they move into a new home, especially because the appliances that they are already have are kept in mint condition. Therefore, when the appliance repair professionals come into the home, their main objective is to make sure the maintenance and repairs include cleaning the parts that cause performance problems and energy to be loss. For example, when the homeowner contacts the appliance repair Brooklyn staff for air conditioner maintenance services, one of their main jobs is to prepare the air conditioning systems for the winter prior to season. While performing their duties, they will have to clean the filters and other areas of the central air conditioning systems thoroughly. The cleaning they do will help these systems to run efficiently throughout the winter without causing problems for the owner of the home.

Reviewing Warranties

In addition to ensuring regular maintenance is done, the owner of the home should also review their records for warranties on the appliances that they have acquired. If the owner has not moved from one location to another for long and extended periods of time, the warranties for the appliances may be expired. On the other hand, if the owner of the new home moves frequently, the appliances that they have acquired may still be under a manufacturer’s warranty. Therefore, the owner may want to keep the appliances that they have from the previous home because they can replace the appliance instead of fixing it. This is based, however, on the terms of the initial appliance contract.

Brooklyn Appliance repair Hot Lines

When an owner chooses to replace some of their appliances with newer ones, they should review all of the terms listed in the contracts. For those manufactures who want to obtain an edge over the competitors, there are different kinds of incentives and perks for buying the products that they offer. For instance, some manufactures offer their appliances with a variety of different benefits including an outstanding service hotline.

These hotlines are attractive for those buyers that do not like to risks the quality of their appliances with repair people from other repair companies. In fact, these owners prefer the best appliance repair services possible. This means they want services from a representative of the company that manufactures and sells the appliance that they possess. When the manufacturer of their appliance supplies a hotline that they can call for repairs and regular maintenance, they are usually more likely to purchase this brand of appliance from the companies that sell them.

Purchasing OEM Parts for Major Appliances

Another key factor in purchasing appliances from the original manufacture is the quality of their parts offered. The types of parts offered are known as OEM or original equipment manufacturer parts. Even though most consumers may not know the different, others are aware of differences. Therefore, they prefer the original equipment manufacturer parts to ‘after market’ parts. While some repairman may say some aftermarket parts are equivalent to the original equipment of the manufacturer, this not always true. These facts or statements are dependent upon the manufacturer and the part that they are referencing. For instance, some car repairman will replace the OEM parts with aftermarket parts because the insurance company will not pay for the original equipment manufacturer part.

One of the main reasons for this decision is the premium amount that would have to be paid. In order to save money, insurance companies and repair shops will install these parts with or without the consumer’s approval. However, if the car owner wants to pursue or contests the issue, the customer can install the OEM parts but they will have to pay the difference between the OEM part and the aftermarket part. With this being said, most people who have a choice will often choose the OEM part instead.

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DeBlasio: ‘Booze cruise’ boats will be shipped out of Sheepshead Bay

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

Party off!

Controversial party boats that attract raucous crowds at Emmons Avenue piers in Sheepshead Bay will be shipped off to a new berth at season’s end, Mayor DeBlasio declared at a town hall meeting in the once-quaint fishing village last night.

“I know there’s been some real concern about late-night activity, that’s very disruptive and does not belong in a residential neighborhood,” Hizzoner said during the gathering at the Connie Lekas School on Avenue Y between Haring and Batchelder streets. “Everyone has a right to enjoy a party boat, just not in the middle of a residential neighbored in the middle of the night. So we’re going to make a change. This current party boat season is about to end, we will over the winter, find a new location for the late night part boats away.”

Locals have been complaining for years about the so-called “booze cruises” wreaking havoc because of the late night loud noise, fights, trash left behind the next morning, and increased congestion. The quality-of-life problems slightly improved in 2015 after Assemblyman Steve Cymbrowitz (D–Sheepshead Bay) proposed legislation to ban the liquor-slinging vessels from the pier, but things took a turn for the worse this summer — prompting Deutsch to draft his own bill that would limit the number of boats by requiring they provide enough parking for guests.

Skippers have fought back against the boat-banners, accusing them of being bigoted since most of the party-boat passengers are black.

DeBlasio didn’t specify where the boats would dock next summer — some locals have pitched moving them to the federally run Canarsie Pier — but so long as they are out of the bay, that is good enough, said a board member of the Sheepshead Bay-Plumb Beach Civic Association, who has been fighting the boats for years.

“I’m very happy. I think they might take our suggestion and make them pick up passengers as Canarsie Pier,” said Tom Paolillo of the Sheepshead Bay-Plumb Beach Civic Association. “It’s a viable alternative, which allows the boats to stay docked in the bay but pick up their passengers where there’s ample parking. I think that would be great.”

DeBlasio, who was joined by Councilman Chaim Deutsch (D–Sheepshead Bay), also discussed a handful of other quality-of-life issues, including a promise to improve the district’s roadways, parks, and schools, along with the following:

• Hizzoner announced that the Department of Environmental Protection would deploy skimmer vessels twice a year to clean the trash that builds up in the Sheepshead Bay inlet.

• DeBlasio pledged to spend $20 million for improvements to the medians along Kings Highway between E. 23th and E. 27th streets.

• He doubled-down on his efforts to bring Russian-speaking translators into the poll sites on election days.

• He announced a clean-up of graffiti along Sheepshead Bay Road, Coney Island Avenue, and Avenue Z.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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Dance revolution: Mayor supports scrapping archaic law that bans boogieing without a license

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Lauren Gill

Brooklyn Daily

He finally stopped dancing around the issue!

Mayor DeBlasio supports the repeal of an archaic law that bans dancing in establishments that do not have a special, hard-to-get license as long as those clubs and bars enact certain basic security measures, a rep announced at a Thursday City Hall hearing on the statute.

“The DeBlasio administration strongly supports repealing the current cabaret law,” said Lindsay Greene, a senior advisor for the Office of Housing and Economic Development. “There are better ways than the current law to create a strong and healthy nightlife economy.”

In June, Greene refused to say whether Hizzoner backed a bill by Councilman Rafael Espinal (D–Bushwick) that proposes abolishing the 1926 cabaret law, citing a pending lawsuit on its constitutionality. The pol introduced the measure that month, arguing the statute was put in place to target black jazz clubs and has been used as a way for police to discriminate against minority groups ever since.

But now DeBlasio will sign legislation to scrap the old law, on the condition it is replaced with one that requires nightlife businesses maintain surveillance cameras and ensure security personnel is properly licensed and registered.

Attendees erupted in a vigorous bout of “jazz hands” — raising their hands and wiggling them rapidly — in approval following the announcement, because clapping is not allowed in Council chambers.

The Department of Consumer Affairs currently enforces the cabaret law, but the police department will be in charge of ensuring haunts are up to code under the new legislation. Espinal worried this change will give cops free reign to target clubs and bars since they can use camera checks as a way to gain entry, but Greene claimed police will only investigate businesses when there is reason for concern.

Dance advocates spoke following Greene’s testimony, including one woman with plenty of experience getting down who suggested the “dance police” might lighten up if they tried cutting a rug themselves.

“Maybe they’ll feel a little better if they start swinging and swaying themselves,” said Mecedes Ellington, the granddaughter of jazz legend Duke Ellington and the first black dancer in the revered June Taylor Dancers troupe.

DeBlasio, despite his gangly 6-foot-5 frame, is somewhat of a dance pioneer himself, most famously creating “The Smackdown” in 2013, choreography in which Hizzoner licks his hand and bangs it on the ground.

But before the mayor can make busting the move legal for all, Espinal needs to amend the bill and then the Council has to vote on it, which is expected to happen in December.

Reach reporter Lauren Gill at lgill@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2511. Follow her on Twitter @laurenk_gill

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Horror stories: Author celebrates creepy covers and terrifying tales

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Alexandra Simon

Brooklyn Daily

Look out!

The pulpy horror novels of the 1970s and ‘80s will lurch to illustrated life at a former funeral home in Greenpoint next week. Horror writer Grady Hendrix will act out portions of his new non-fiction book “Paperbacks from Hell” at the Film Noir Cinema on Sept. 19, as part of a monthly series of lectures from the Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies. Hendrix says that he will use songs, images, and film clips to celebrate the two-decade reign of spooky novels over the bookstore shelves.

“I’m going to do a live performance of my book and talk about the history of the paperback boom and the lurid covers that came out of that,” said Hendrix. “It’s got songs, some slides, images from the covers, and I’m going to make it fun and entertaining.”

The horror novel boom kicked off at the end of the 1960s with “Rosemary’s Baby,” said Hendrix, and its film adaptation just increased interest in the genre.

“Horror didn’t exist in fiction until ‘Rosemary Baby.’ When that book came out it was quite honestly the first horror novel bestseller since the ’40s, and then the movie of course was also a big hit,” he said. “Then came ‘The Exorcist’ and that was a hit movie and both of those books were bestsellers for a long time.”

Horror authors soon spawned new and fascinating sub-genres focusing on demonic kids, medical horrors, leprechauns, and killer animals — which is one of Hendrix’s favorites.

“I’m always on the animal’s side, and I’m always looking for the next killer animal,” he said.

The genre’s death in the ’90s came from both overproduction and an excessive focus on blood and gore, said Hendrix, with the success of “The Silence of the Lambs” leading other writers to cash in with their own serial killer novels.

“A lot of writers attempted to push boundaries and got more into gore, and right around that time more serial killer books were coming out and the genre was producing too many paperback books — so we ended up with a huge glut of gory serial killer books that stained the genre for a long time,” said Hendrix.

After his live act, Hendrix will lead a discussion with three well-known artists who painted horror cover: Jill Bauman, Lisa Falkenstern, and Hector Garrido. Hendrix hopes his book and the show will help revive interest in the talented creators that pushed the horror novel genre into popularity

“I want people to remember that these writers exist,” said Hendrix. “This way I bring attention to the artists and these authors, because they don’t deserve to be forgotten the way they have been.”

“Paperbacks From Hell” at Film Noir Cinema [122 Meserole Ave. at Leonard Street in Greenpoint, (718) 389–5773, www.miskatonic-nyc.com]. Sept. 19 at 7 pm. $15 ($12 in advance).

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Bay Ridge is full of kid stuff

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne McShane

Brooklyn Daily

There is fun for the whole family this weekend in Bay Ridge!

Start off the weekend by taking your littlest Ridgites to Super Hero Day at John J. Carty Park (Fort Hamilton Parkway between 94th Street and 101st Street). On Friday from 3:30 to 5:30 pm, the supertykes can play musical chairs, race friends and foes in a relay, and make arts and crafts. Snacks and drinks will be available and costumes are encouraged — for heroes and villains alike.

Then relive the days of your own youth with a 7 pm viewing of “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” at the “Back to the ’80s” movie night at St. Patrick’s Parish (9511 Fourth Ave. at 96th Street). Barbecue dishes, popcorn, cotton candy, and cold drinks will be on sale, and a face painter can entertain the kids while you reminisce about the good old days. And feel free to make your own decade-appropriate costume out of legwarmers and a Twisted Sister t-shirt. (Bueller?)

And on Saturday night, there is another free family-friendly movie hitting town: zoom over to McKinley Park (Seventh Avenue and Bay Ridge Parkway) for a 7 pm screening of “The Angry Bird Movie.” The animated flick, based on my nephew’s favorite phone game, stars former “Saturday Night Live” star Jason Sudeikis as a bird with a bad temper facing off with unwelcome porcine visitors.

For an adult alternative, ditch the kids and dance Saturday night away at CaringKind’s “Faith, Hope, Cure, and Music” fund-raising event for Alzheimer’s research at St. Patrick’s Auditorium (401 97th St. at Fourth Avenue). For $25 you can enjoy wraps, salads, and snacks while the Rhapsody Players play tunes from the ’60s through the ‘80s, with songs from the Eagles, the Supremes, Whitney Houston, and the Bee Gees. Adult beverages will be on sale, and you can kick off your shoes and dance starting at 7:30 pm.

Reach reporter Julianne McShane at (718) 260–2523 or by e-mail at jmcshane@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @juliannemcshane.

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Disk connection: Film Noir Cinema still rents movies, hosts shows

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Danielle Kogan

Brooklyn Daily

The video store is not dead!

One of the city’s last video stores is not just surviving — it is thriving. Greenpoint’s Film Noir Cinema recently expanded, taking over a former funeral home and giving it new life as a retail store and screening room. The store’s owner says that his unique selection of rare films has allowed him to outlast the competition.

“When I opened 15 years ago, there were seven video stores in the area. A Blockbuster here died out, and people laughed that I killed them,” said Will Malitek.

And the Polish immigrant is not worried about competition from streaming film services Amazon and Netflix. His knowledge of foreign films and curated selection of high-quality, out-of-print arthouse flicks gives him the advantage, he said.

“I think I am their competition, and to me this is more than money. It’s my passion,” said Malitek.

In fact, in the age of digital streaming, people are seeking physical items more than ever — especially unique older items.

“It used to be more renting than selling, and now it’s the opposite. People collect now — they want to see it on their shelves,” said Malitek “And if it’s vintage? That’s a magic word, I say.”

Behind his video rental area, Malitek has installed a surprisingly spacious 54-seat theater, which hosts nightly screening of obscure films.

The space also holds special events, such as the monthly Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies lecture series, starting on Sept. 19, and an upcoming screening of 1920s Expressionist film “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari” with the band Reel Orchestrette providing live music, on Sept. 23. Malitek thinks that the combination of old film and new music will attract an audience.

“We’re bringing a modern approach to an old idea. It’s something different,” he said.

Film Noir Cinema [122 Meserole Ave. at Leonard Street in Greenpoint, (718) 389–5773, www.filmnoircinema.com]. Open daily, 3–11 pm. One-day DVD rental $3.50.

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Going for the gold: Parachute Jump lights up for cancer awareness

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne McShane

Brooklyn Daily

Locals looked up last Friday night to watch the Coney Island Parachute Jump go gold for childhood cancer awareness at Luna Park.

Luna Park funds the lighting of the Parachute Jump, but the office of Councilman Mark Treyger (D–Coney Island) and local organization Frankie’s Mission stepped up and organized the fourth-annual event. Treyger joined other elected officials at the event and thanked attendees for supporting local children and families battling childhood cancer.

“I would like to thank everyone who took the time to join us and show support to the families battling childhood cancer and to raise awareness of the need for increased funding,” said Councilman Treyger. “I am proud to continue organizing this event because these families and advocates are doing inspiring work, and this is our way of showing them they are not alone.”

September is National Childhood Cancer Awareness month. One parent of a five-year-old Staten Island boy who just recently beat cancer said that her son was happy to see the Jump go gold in his honor, even if he did not fully understand the gravity of what it symbolized.

“I don’t think he really understood the whole thing, but he was really excited,” said Danielle Capuano of her son Dominick.

Capuano battled leukemia for two years after he was initially diagnosed when he was two and a half years old. He finished treatment this past December and is now thriving, his mother said.

“He’s doing great,” she said. “He just started kindergarten.”

Capuano also brought her daughter, Gianna, as well as her nieces, Gabrielle and Giulianna Triano, to the event. The four kids sported sweatshirts with the slogan “Team Dominick: Fight Against Leukemia.”

Assemblywoman Pamela Harris (D–Coney Island) and Councilman Vincent Gentile (D–Bay Ridge) joined Treyger at the event, and Cyclones mascot Sandy the Seagull also made an appearance.

Frankie’s Mission, the organization that was the co-sponsor for the event, was formed in memory of Bay Ridge resident Francesco Loccisano, who battled cancer for three years and died just after his 17th birthday.

Reach reporter Julianne McShane at (718) 260–2523 or by e-mail at jmcshane@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @juliannemcshane.

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Forgotten son: Care center waited days to tell Sheepshead mom her still-missing adult child disappeared

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Lauren Gill

Brooklyn Daily

A Gravesend adult-care facility with a history of losing patients neglected to tell a woman her son was missing for nearly a week after he disappeared on Aug. 31, and he still hasn’t surfaced 14 days later, leaving her worried for his life.

“I’m beside myself. I don’t know how he’s eating, how he’s surviving, I’m going out of my mind,” said Sheepshead Bay resident Fredda Anhalt.

Her 50-year-old son, Wayne Anhalt, is a resident of Kings Adult Care Center, where he has lived for more than two years. He suffers from paranoid schizophrenia affective disorder, a mental illness that can cause scrambled thinking, hallucinations, and paranoia.

Anhalt went to visit her son at the Cropsey Avenue facility on Sept. 1 around dinner time, and a receptionist told her that she saw him leave around 7 am that morning, the mom said. He ran away from the center before, so Anhalt suspected he dashed again and immediately called the police, she said.

Six days later, a social worker from the facility called Anhalt and said that her son went missing after being dropped off for an appointment at Park Slope’s Langone Family Health Center on 13th Street and Fourth Avenue. The care center arranged his transportation there, but he never made it to the consultation after exiting his ride, the worker told Anhalt, who said she should have been informed beforehand so she could accompany her son on the trip.

“Why didn’t they let me know he had the appointment? I would’ve went with him, they know his history, that he would take off,” she said.

Wayne Anhalt’s previous escape from the center lasted two days before his mother found him in front of a Bensonhurst McDonald’s.

And he is not the first patient the facility has lost track of — a 74-year-old woman went missing from it in January.

The case is being handled by the police department’s Missing Persons Squad, which is still investigating it, according to a spokesman. Anhalt said she spoke with the lead detective last week, who told the mom she was contacting the Park Slope clinic to get surveillance footage of her son exiting the vehicle that drove him there.

A care center administrator refused to answer questions about the case and how it keeps track of patients, claiming she legally was not able to comment.

But Anhalt — who has been driving around Brooklyn in search of her son and calling hospitals to see if he was admitted — said something seems fishy and demands to know why she was left in the dark.

“I’m very worried, I just feel like something’s not right,” she said. “I don’t trust the home, why didn’t they tell me the truth right away?”

Wayne Anhalt is approximately 6-feet tall with dark hair and brown eyes, his mother said.

Have you seen him? Police ask anyone with information about this missing person to call (800) 577–8477, submit tips at www.nypdcrimestoppers.com, or text 274637 followed by TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

Reach reporter Lauren Gill at lgill@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2511. Follow her on Twitter @laurenk_gill

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Have a cuppa!: Marine Park Coffee serving up cup of joe

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Joanna DelBuono

Brooklyn Daily

Marine Park

Have a cuppa!

Nothing says “Good morning,” like a great cup of joe. Put your hands together and welcome Marine Park Coffee to the fold. Owner Jhonn Thomassen realized that a tremendous void existed in his neck of the woods, so he took action and did something about it. He opened Marine Park Coffee.

Jhonn carefully roasts and blends the specially selected little brown jewels and perks them to perfection in order to delight your palate and make your taste buds jump for joy.

Not only a maker of quality brew, Jhonn is also a smart business man, and Marine Park Coffee offers espresso, teas, fresh juices, and light snacks.

The shop is open six days a week, Monday through Friday from 6 am to 4 pm, and on Sundays from 8 am to 4 pm.

So fuhgeddaboud Starbucks and Dunkin’, now there’s Marine Park Coffee to quench that caffeine hankering.

Marine Park Coffee [3602 B Quentin Rd. at 36th Street in Marine Park, (347) 857–8499, marineparkcoffee.com].

Read Standing O every Thursday on BrooklynDaily.com!

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Horror stories: Author celebrates creepy covers and terrifying tales

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Alexandra Simon

Brooklyn Daily

Look out!

The pulpy horror novels of the 1970s and ‘80s will lurch to illustrated life at a former funeral home in Greenpoint next week. Horror writer Grady Hendrix will act out portions of his new non-fiction book “Paperbacks from Hell” at the Film Noir Cinema on Sept. 19, as part of a monthly series of lectures from the Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies. Hendrix says that he will use songs, images, and film clips to celebrate the two-decade reign of spooky novels over the bookstore shelves.

“I’m going to do a live performance of my book and talk about the history of the paperback boom and the lurid covers that came out of that,” said Hendrix. “It’s got songs, some slides, images from the covers, and I’m going to make it fun and entertaining.”

The horror novel boom kicked off at the end of the 1960s with “Rosemary’s Baby,” said Hendrix, and its film adaptation just increased interest in the genre.

“Horror didn’t exist in fiction until ‘Rosemary Baby.’ When that book came out it was quite honestly the first horror novel bestseller since the ’40s, and then the movie of course was also a big hit,” he said. “Then came ‘The Exorcist’ and that was a hit movie and both of those books were bestsellers for a long time.”

Horror authors soon spawned new and fascinating sub-genres focusing on demonic kids, medical horrors, leprechauns, and killer animals — which is one of Hendrix’s favorites.

“I’m always on the animal’s side, and I’m always looking for the next killer animal,” he said.

The genre’s death in the ’90s came from both overproduction and an excessive focus on blood and gore, said Hendrix, with the success of “The Silence of the Lambs” leading other writers to cash in with their own serial killer novels.

“A lot of writers attempted to push boundaries and got more into gore, and right around that time more serial killer books were coming out and the genre was producing too many paperback books — so we ended up with a huge glut of gory serial killer books that stained the genre for a long time,” said Hendrix.

Resort World

After his live act, Hendrix will lead a discussion with three well-known artists who painted horror cover: Jill Bauman, Lisa Falkenstern, and Hector Garrido. Hendrix hopes his book and the show will help revive interest in the talented creators that pushed the horror novel genre into popularity

“I want people to remember that these writers exist,” said Hendrix. “This way I bring attention to the artists and these authors, because they don’t deserve to be forgotten the way they have been.”

“Paperbacks From Hell” at Film Noir Cinema [122 Meserole Ave. at Leonard Street in Greenpoint, (718) 389–5773, www.miskatonic-nyc.com]. Sept. 19 at 7 pm. $15 ($12 in advance).

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Royal mess: State asking for comment on finishing Kings Plaza cleanup

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

It’s a cleanup fit for a king.

The state’s Department of Environmental Conservation plans to clean up toxins deep under the ground left behind by a former plastics and oil company at the site of what’s now Kings Plaza — but is asking the public for its input until the end of the month before wrapping up the work.

Presto Plastics Products Company operated on the site near Avenue U and E. 55th Street — now a paved access road to the mall — from the 1930s to the 1960s, and Sun Oil Company did from 1961 until 1965, leaving behind oil-filled tanks about 10 feet under the dirt. And the greasy stuff had seeped out over the years, making it high time it gets scrubbed clean, said the district manager of Community Board 18.

“We welcome this overdue cleanup process,” said Dottie Turano.

Workers lifted out the physical tanks in 2008, but the toxins — petroleum and chlorinated compounds — spread beyond what was immediately excavated, and so contractors, under the supervision of the state agency, will finish cleaning up the remaining contamination, according to the Department of Environmental Conservation.

Throughout the past year, the department identified and removed so-called hot spot regions of contamination using chemical oxidation injections, according to the state agency.

The site was originally part of the Department of Environmental’s voluntary cleanup program, but since that ends in March 2018, the state transitioned all of those applications to the Brownfield Cleanup Program, which requires public review and comment, according to a department spokesman.

The surrounding water is not used for drinking, so locals don’t have to worry about having a glass out of their tap, and no chemicals have leaked into the nearby nature preserve or marina, the spokesman said.

The agency is monitoring the surrounding air, but no impacts to its quality have so-far been recorded, according to a spokesman. Head honchos expect the cleanup to wrap in the next six months, and will accept public comment until Sept. 29, according to the Department of Environmental Conservation.

To read more about the cleanup, enter site ID #C224263 at http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/derexternal/index.cfm?pageid=3. Anyone can submit a comment to the site Project Manager Ioana Munteanu-Ramnic via email at ioana.muntanu-ramnic@dec.ny.gov or by calling (718) 482–4065. All comments must be submitted by Sept. 29, 2017.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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