Visit our Partner, Bear Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY

Visit Our Appliance Repair Partners in the Bensonhurst region of Brooklyn, NY

Bear Appliance Repair

Appliance Repair Experts in Brooklyn, NY and serving Queens, Manhattan and Staten Island

Choosing appliances to furnish a home can be expensive and time consuming for any homeowner. When a new homeowner purchases a new home they normally want all new appliances when they move in. From new kitchen ovens to new washing machines, they want the whole treatment. Even though a brand new appliance decision is an excellent move, it may the best one for those who can afford it. In some situations, all new appliances may not be possible unless the owner of the home wants to incur a lot of debt when they are moving in. Therefore, it is important for each individual owner to assess his or her financial circumstances before going forward. If they can afford the new appliances with ease, this will be their decision.

Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY

Fortunately, all new appliances are not always the best option, especially if the homeowner had good quality appliances in their previous homes. While some people may not take good care of the appliances that have, others are great at ensuring they call companies like Bear Appliance Repair in Brooklyn, NY into their homes.

These companies can help the owners to ensure the appliances are repaired right and have the proper maintenance performed on schedule. For instance, Bear Appliance Repair can be called in for regular maintenance and repairs for all of the appliances in the kitchen area as well as other areas of the home. All of the maintenance can be performed in one setting, especially if the homeowner knows how to develop a plan that will work for both the company and the owner of the home. On the other hand, if they have appliances in most areas of the home, the appliance repair technicians may want to break the repair jobs up and perform them on different days and time. This will allow the employees in the company to do a good maintenance and repair job with each individual appliance that is in the home.

If these jobs are done too quickly or these professionals are rushed to complete every appliance at one time, these professionals may not have the time allotments to provide their best quality services.

With regular appliance maintenance, the homeowner will not have to be concerned about buying new appliances when they move into a new home, especially because the appliances that they are already have are kept in mint condition. Therefore, when the appliance repair professionals come into the home, their main objective is to make sure the maintenance and repairs include cleaning the parts that cause performance problems and energy to be loss. For example, when the homeowner contacts the appliance repair Brooklyn staff for air conditioner maintenance services, one of their main jobs is to prepare the air conditioning systems for the winter prior to season. While performing their duties, they will have to clean the filters and other areas of the central air conditioning systems thoroughly. The cleaning they do will help these systems to run efficiently throughout the winter without causing problems for the owner of the home.

Reviewing Warranties

In addition to ensuring regular maintenance is done, the owner of the home should also review their records for warranties on the appliances that they have acquired. If the owner has not moved from one location to another for long and extended periods of time, the warranties for the appliances may be expired. On the other hand, if the owner of the new home moves frequently, the appliances that they have acquired may still be under a manufacturer’s warranty. Therefore, the owner may want to keep the appliances that they have from the previous home because they can replace the appliance instead of fixing it. This is based, however, on the terms of the initial appliance contract.

Brooklyn Appliance repair Hot Lines

When an owner chooses to replace some of their appliances with newer ones, they should review all of the terms listed in the contracts. For those manufactures who want to obtain an edge over the competitors, there are different kinds of incentives and perks for buying the products that they offer. For instance, some manufactures offer their appliances with a variety of different benefits including an outstanding service hotline.

These hotlines are attractive for those buyers that do not like to risks the quality of their appliances with repair people from other repair companies. In fact, these owners prefer the best appliance repair services possible. This means they want services from a representative of the company that manufactures and sells the appliance that they possess. When the manufacturer of their appliance supplies a hotline that they can call for repairs and regular maintenance, they are usually more likely to purchase this brand of appliance from the companies that sell them.

Purchasing OEM Parts for Major Appliances

Another key factor in purchasing appliances from the original manufacture is the quality of their parts offered. The types of parts offered are known as OEM or original equipment manufacturer parts. Even though most consumers may not know the different, others are aware of differences. Therefore, they prefer the original equipment manufacturer parts to ‘after market’ parts. While some repairman may say some aftermarket parts are equivalent to the original equipment of the manufacturer, this not always true. These facts or statements are dependent upon the manufacturer and the part that they are referencing. For instance, some car repairman will replace the OEM parts with aftermarket parts because the insurance company will not pay for the original equipment manufacturer part.

One of the main reasons for this decision is the premium amount that would have to be paid. In order to save money, insurance companies and repair shops will install these parts with or without the consumer’s approval. However, if the car owner wants to pursue or contests the issue, the customer can install the OEM parts but they will have to pay the difference between the OEM part and the aftermarket part. With this being said, most people who have a choice will often choose the OEM part instead.

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[BAY RIDGE] What the truck?!? New sanitation trucks leave Bay Ridge streets littered with junk

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

They just can’t get enough junk in the trunk.

The city must rework how it collects large junk from Bay Ridge and Dyker Heights streets because the Department of Sanitation’s new garbage trucks have less space to cram in hulking waste, according to locals.

Mattresses, furniture, and other large items are piling up curbside because the area’s new trucks are split between trash and organics. Now an extra truck swings by occasionally to collect the leftovers, but workers miss items that are then left to fester for weeks. The new procedure is just one big mess, said a community leader.

“The problem is the system in place is not effective,” said Josphine Beckmann, district manager of Community Board 10. “We’re getting a ton of complaints about items that have been missed for weeks. Before this, we had no complaints about missed bulk pick up, now we have so many.”

The Department of Sanitation rolled out the so called “dual bin trucks” in October 2016, which are divided into two compartments — one for trash and the other for biodegradables — as part of the city’s organics collection program, where residents haul bins packed with food scraps and yard waste to the curb for pick up, according to a Sanitation spokeswoman.

But the trucks’ split trash compactor means the garbage side fills up faster and makes it more difficult to crunch what the city calls “bulk” items — anything bigger than four feet by three feet — and things get left behind, according to Beckmann. The result is a hodgepodge of junk littering the streets until a truck with the specific purpose of picking up bulk comes by. And that only happens if workers remember to fill out a form logging the rubbish and pass it along to a supervisor, according to an agency spokeswoman.

From October 2016 to March 2017, 311 logged nearly 300 complaints for missed bulk collection — compared to zero for the same period the year before, according to city data. But tossing a bookcase or a boudoir isn’t an everyday occurrence, so the city doesn’t think locals should be making such a stink, said an agency spokeswoman.

“It’s not every day that you’re throwing out a couch or a mattress,” said Belinda Mager. “Most of the time the dual bin truck will collect everything. Generally a single truck can manage.”

But locals beg to differ, and say the problem is only getting worse, according to one Ridgite who schlepped his mattress to the curb multiple times for pick up — but with no luck.

“I’ve hauled out my mattress twice so far and both times it was ignored,” said Bay Ridgite Gabriel Vaduva, who has lived on Gatling Place for the last six years. “It’s covered up and meets all [the city’s] requirements, but nobody picks it up. And I know I’m not alone — I see sofas and La-Z-Boys all over the place. They better do something, because it’s trash city out here.”

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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[MIDWOOD] Another bomb threat against Brooklyn Jewish center

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

Someone texted in a bomb threat to a Midwood Jewish center on March 10, prompting an evacuation of the Coney Island Avenue building around 8 am, just one day after the Jewish Children’s Museum in Crown Heights received its own emailed bomb threat. Both threats were unfounded, but rattled nerves nonetheless.

Police responded to the Jewish Association Serving the Aging at 8:05 am after someone working for the agency got a text that a bomb would go off, officials said. Police would not go into more detail about who received the text or what else it said.

Officers searched and cleared the building between Foster Avenue and Avenue H, and deemed it safe for everyone to go back inside by 10:22 am, a police department spokesman said.

Police are investigating the incident and its ties to the handful of other threats made against Jewish centers around the city, a department spokesman said.

But locals are not so much cringing in fear as they are in fuming frustration — and are hoping the stream of unfounded threats is not a disturbed plot to “cry wolf” enough to bring everyone’s guard down, said photographer Simon Gifter, who was on the scene.

“There’s no fear. The sense I got from interviewing people, they are sick and tired, not even scared anymore. They are just fed up with the whole situation. That’s the mindset of a lot of people, ‘another stupid bomb threat,’” said Gifter. “But what if people start letting their guard down? They are in a bind, have to take it seriously because if they don’t and something happens.”

Officials believe the scares are all coming from one sick copycat with sophisticated technology to disguise himself — after Missourian Juan Thompson was arrested last week for numerous threats across the county.

One local pol took to social media to lament the relentless stream threats coming day after day.

Elder Care Expo

“It seems that hardly a day goes by without a threat to an innocent Jewish institution. Elderly people threatened today, children yesterday,” Assemblyman Dov Hikind (D–Midwood) wrote on Facebook. “With all of the resources that are allegedly being dedicated to identifying the culprits and bringing them to justice, why has there only been one arrest? The current theory is that it’s one individual making these threats. So why can’t he be stopped?”

And now Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is leading the charge with a letter to the Department of Homeland Security demanding it increase federal funding to ensure the security and protection of religious institutions across the country on the heels of the growing number of bomb threats this year. The letter, signed by 18 senators from both sides of the aisle, cites the recent scares at many Jewish centers.

The need for protection is imperative and the federal government must recognize the severity of what’s going on, said Gillibrand.

“New Yorkers shouldn’t have to live or worship in fear,” she said. “Hate crimes and threats are on the rise and we can’t stand idly by and do nothing, or pretend it’s not happening. Now more than ever, we need to make sure our places of worship and community centers have the right resources to protect themselves. I’m asking the Trump administration to take these threats seriously and dedicate more federal dollars to protecting religious and community centers.”

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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[GERRITSEN BEACH] Driver hits and kills Gerritsen Beach woman

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

A driver struck and killed Gerritsen Beach resident Carmen Santacruz just steps from her Gerritsen Avenue home on March 7, police said.

The 55-year-old driver was heading toward Lois Avenue in his 2016 red Ford pickup truck when he struck 69-year-old Santacruz between Whitney Avenue and Avenue W at about 6:20 pm, according to authorities. Santacruz was crossing the neighborhood’s main thoroughfare towards Veterans Memorial Way, right across from her house in the middle of the block, when the driver struck her, police said.

Emergency responders arrived at the scene and found her unconscious and unresponsive, and transported her to Coney Island Hospital, where she then died, a police department spokesman said.

The driver remained at the scene — he was not intoxicated and does not have a suspended license, the spokesman said.

The city’s Collision Investigation Squad is investigating the accident, police said.

Locals have pushed for more traffic lights along Gerritsen Avenue after a drunk driver hit and killed 17-year-old Sean Ryan, who was riding his bike in the middle of the street near Florence Avenue on July 17.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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[BENSONHURST] Grave concerns: Controversy over toppled headstones in Jewish cemetery

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

They cast the first tombstone.

Local pols rushed to hold a press conference at Mapleton’s Washington Cemetery on March 5 to decry 42 toppled tombstones as an act of vandalism, but officials at the largely Jewish cemetery — whom the pols didn’t consult — say the headstones simply fell over because of age and the elements.

Now cemetery officials are blaming the politicians for sowing fear without doing their homework.

“These politicians rushed to judgement that it’s vandalism,” said Micheal Ciamaga, the manager of the Bay Parkway burial ground. “If they would have contacted us and waited, we could have wrapped this up easily with them. Some of the older stones are unstable and fall over. It’s not vandalism.”

Assemblyman Dov Hikind (D–Borough Park) led a press conference with Councilman David Greenfield (D–Midwood), and community leaders on the fallen grave markers after a local who regularly strolls the grounds on the Sabbath noticed the stones and alerted officials after sundown. Pols consulted with police, who had begun investigating the matter, but broadcast their concerns before speaking with managers at the cemetery, according to Hikind who tweeted “#Antisemitism” with a picture of an overturned headstone Sunday morning.

Police have since determined that the fallen headstones were not toppled by vandals, said a detective.

“There isn’t any evidence that it’s vandalism. It seems like it was a result of long-term neglect,” said Detective Ahmed Nasser. “The case status is still open, however, based on speaking with the manager of the cemetery, it seems the stones fell as a result of long-term neglect and the environment.”

But Hikind and community leaders continue to insist that it’s no coincidence that dozens of tombstones in the same section of the graveyard are down. They point to a break in the barbed wire on the six-foot fence near 20th Avenue and 57th Street that bounds the cemetery as a sign that something more is going on. Some stones may be falling because of neglect, but local pols still suspect foul play, said Hikind.

“Those tombstones that the cemetery said were lying down, those are not the ones we are talking about. I’m aware of those. The issue is that in this one section of the cemetery you have all these tombstones that look like they were tampered with,” said Hikind. “I don’t believe it was the wind that blew them down — that’s ridiculous. Someone cut the fence to get into the cemetery — quiet obviously. Something is not kosher here.”

Washington Cemetery is no strangers to desecration. In 2010, vandals scrawled graffiti on 200 tombstones and pushed them over. And news of the disturbed stones comes after vandals targeted a series of Jewish cemeteries in upstate New York, Pennsylvania, and Missouri.

But Washington Cemetery’s manger says family members are responsible for maintaining the headstones and at times they go uncared for. If workers spot a downed stone they set it upright. But in the winter it’s harder for workers to keep up with raising downed stones because the sprawling cemetery lacks its seasonal staff, and it may be a while before workers even notice the toppled stones, according to Ciamaga.

Nevertheless community leaders remain skeptical and demand an in-depth investigation before dismissing the act.

“I believe that it’s a strong possibility that it was vandalism, and I would like a thorough investigation,” said Barry Spitzer, Community Board 12’s district manager. “What we’ve called for is an investigation, and I don’t think this is creating fear. We need a thorough investigation because if it was vandalism, then a very serve and grave crime was committed here.”

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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[MARINE PARK] Exit pole!

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Julianne Cuba

Brooklyn Daily

A new city law increases fines slapped on utility companies — such as Con Ed and Verizon — that don’t remove abandoned poles when they add new ones. Councilman Alan Maisel (D–Marine Park) introduced the legislation because of the staggering number of wooden poles in his district left to rot and fall over, including two in Gerritsen Beach that were tilted over at nearly 45-degree angles, he said.

“Utility poles are popping up all over the place. Not sure if you all notice it, but now I can’t help but notice them. Where a new utility pole was put up, they don’t take down the old one,” said Maisel during a Community Board 18 meeting on Feb. 15. “Some of our streets are beginning to look like palisades, one pole after another pole. We actually had in Gerritsen Beach, two poles that were leaning at 45-degree angles, and it takes quite a bit of effort to take down the poles that really are in bad shape.”

The city could previously charge a utility company $250–$500 for leaving in an unused pole, but the new legislation raises that fine to a minimum of $350 and a maximum of $750, and requires the city to notify the company 10 days in advance of getting fined if they don’t pull it out of the ground, according to Maisel, which he hopes will increase compliance.

“The greater the fine, the more likely people don’t want to pay it,” he said. “They will be more anxious to comply with the law.”

In addition to the increased fines, the legislation creates a system for following up and actually collecting the fines, which Maisel doubts happened much in the past.

“The city was not organized to bring this to the attention of the utilities. I don’t think anybody has ever been fined for it.”

Redundant utility poles have raised hackles in Marine Park a few times before, particularly when one lady’s beloved Linden tree had a brush with death after Con Ed inserted a new wooden pole right in its flower bed, but the utility company quickly came to the rescue and removed it.

And about six months after that, extraneous poles blocked the crosswalk signals at a few intersections in the neighborhood.

Verizon declined to comment, according to spokesman Ray McConville. A spokesman for Con Ed said the company will work with the city’s new legislation.

“We’re aware of the new legislation and will work with the city to achieve its objectives,” said Con Ed’s Bob McGee.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.

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[►VIDEO, CONEY ISLAND] The Fast & the Furious: MCU Drift

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

Time to make the donuts!

Locals with a need for speed played hooky and treated MCU Park’s snow-covered parking lot as their own personal racetrack during Winter Storm Niko on Thursday. Thrill seekers floored it and did donuts on the yet-to-be-plowed lot — the perfect way to spend the snow day, said one speed demon.

“It’s the best feeling in the world to put the peddle to the metal and spin around in the snow,” said Coney Islander Steve, who would not give his last name because he was driving his company’s truck. “I come here every year. A bunch of locals do. It’s just really fun.”

The car park has become a popular spot to drift in the snow in recent years, according to locals who grab friends and tear up the powder-covered pavement for hours.

Half a dozen trucks and drifters cruised the parking lot, spraying snow while plowmen worked around the roadsters.

“Yeah, we’re really not supposed to be here, but the guys who plow the parking lot give us a lot of leeway,” said Bensonhurster Milan Glosik, whose Jeep is outfitted with mud tires that let him rip through the slippery fluff. “It’s just a great open space. It’d be a shame not to.”

But the staff at MCU Park were not exactly pleased with the impromptu racing. It usually takes about four hours to clear the ballpark’s sprawling lot, but the donut-makers compound the task by compacting the snow, said one worker.

“It’s not so great for us trying to clear the lot because they’re compacting the snow and sheets of ice will form a lot quicker,” said a MCU Park worker who declined to give his name because he did not have permission to speak to the press. “But hey, I get the urge. If I wasn’t working, I’d probably join them.”

Video by Caroline Spivack

Video by Caroline Spivack
Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at mspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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[PARK SLOPE] For whom the bridge tolls: Brooklynites demand two-way fee on VZ — to keep New Jersey out

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Colin Mixson

Brooklyn Daily

They want to build a wall — and make New Jersey pay for it!

The Feds must once again charge Brooklyn-bound drivers traversing the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge its famously exorbitant toll when a cashless collection system is put in place this summer — if only to ensure New Jersey commuters stay off Brooklyn streets, a Park Slope panel demanded this week.

Community Board 6’s district manager says that Jerseyites have for too long been clogging up Brooklyn highways and byways while en route to Manhattan, spewing exhaust and littering the streets thanks to a two-decade old law that allowed them free passage into the borough via the city’s longest span.

“What is left now is an economic-biased travel decision which favors the ‘free’ flow of traffic from Staten Island to Brooklyn which passes through our district especially during the morning rush hour,” wrote Community Board 6 district manager Craig Hammerman in a letter to Gov. Cuomo. “Our highways are regularly congested.”

The current one-way toll for Staten Island-bound traffic dates back to 1986 when Islanders, claiming idling cars waiting to pay the Brooklyn-bound toll were causing too much pollution, convinced Congress to pass a law demanding the once-two-way toll be collected only when vehicles came to the Rock. That gave New Jersey drivers the ability to leap-frog into Manhattan through Staten Island and Brooklyn for free, bypassing the Verrazano toll by circling to the Holland tunnel when they head home to Monmouth County.

But this summer, the Verrazano is getting a cashless toll system — where cameras record license plates as drivers zoom by — making concerns about booth-induced smog a thing of the past, and creating an opportunity to start hitting Jersey drivers where it hurts, Hammerman argues.

It is a change people down in Bay Ridge have been demanding for years, according to local leaders.

“CB10 has consistently in the past few years voted in support of restoring two-way tolls,” said Community Board 10 district manager Josephine Beckmann. “We have backups at every single exit ramp in the morning.”

But Rep. Dan Donovan (R–Bay Ridge), who also represents all of Staten Island, vowed to oppose any measure to restore the two-way toll until he’s seen data proving that the change would decrease traffic and increase revenue, according to spokesman Patrick Ryan.

CB6’s letter to the governor requested a study to determine the effect of a two-way toll, but until then, the change will be a tough sell to Staten Island voters, according to Ryan.

“I think that with any constituency when you propose changing something that’s been in effect 30 years, all these theories come up that it’s going to be worse because of X-Y-Z,” Ryan said. “But if you can say ‘We’re going to get X amount of revenue we can use for this project,’ that makes it easier to discuss.”

Rep. and Trumpbuster Jerry Nadler (D–Gowanus), meanwhile, has been a longtime supporter of the two-way toll, but came under fire from constituents after he failed to bring back the two-way toll when the House and Senate were controlled by Democrats during the early years of Obama’s first term, according to one activist.

“The Dems had a veto-proof Congress and Nadler failed to do what he had promised his constituents,” said Carl Rosenstein, a Manhattanite who created a group called Trees Not Trucks to combat commercial trucking traffic caused by the one-way toll.

But ramming the change through Congress is more difficult than it seems, because it needs to be tacked onto more substantial transportation legislation, which didn’t materialize during the two-year window, according to Nadler’s district director Robert Gottheim.

But with the new toll technology and President Trump championing new highway infrastructure programs, Nadler sees both the will and a way to realize a two-way toll on the Verrazano on the horizon, Gottheim said.

“Looking forward, there’s a strong chance this can be done,” he said.

Cuomo’s office did not return requests for comment.

Reach reporter Colin Mixson at cmixson@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4505.

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St. Agatha School to close after 100 years, citing financial woes

See this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

They’re praying for a miracle.

Parents and students are scrambling to find a modestly priced Catholic school since the Diocese of Brooklyn announced it would shutter Sunset Park’s St. Agatha School after nearly 100 years due to dwindling enrollment and a lack of money. The academy’s modest tuition is a boon to low-income families in the nabe seeking a faith-based education, and it would be a real sin if it closed, according to one faculty member.

“A lot of parents can’t afford to send their kids anywhere else,” said a school worker who asked to remain anonymous because she did not have permission to speak to the press. “There is only one other Catholic school in the neighborhood, and for some of the families, it just costs too much — they just can’t afford it. And it’s cruel for the diocese to make this announcement now, because it’s the middle of the school year. It came as a shock to all of us.”

Last month, church officials announced plans to shutter the K–8 academy at the end of the academic year on June 30.

The diocese sets tuition rates and gives schools individual budgets for subsidizing students’ education. Tuition at St. Agatha is $3,949 per year, and operating the school costs $5,300 per student — a roughly $1,300 subsidy per pupil, according to officials.

But the diocese doesn’t want to pony up any more, in part because enrollment has shrunk from 178 to 144 over the past seven years.

“This school year, there are eight classes with less than 20 students,” stated a Jan. 10 letter informing parents of the closure. “The parish does not have the reserves to subsidize the school for the future, and the parish cannot subsidize the school at the expense of parish programs and ministries. To attempt to continue the school while further curtailing academic services and extra-curricular activities would be a serious disservice to your sons and daughters.”

Many are skeptical that the diocese is as hard-pressed as it is implying and instead believe the body wants to make a quick buck renting the space to the city’s overcrowded School District 15.

“The diocese is just interested in the money. They don’t care about the students and the fact that this school is a historical pillar in the community,” said Sunset Parker Juliana Rivera, whose son and daughter attend St. Agatha School. “They’re probably going to rent the building out to a public school and collect rent.”

If that’s true, it wouldn’t be the first time. Officials shuttered the beloved Bishop Ford High School, a 52-year-old Windsor Terrace Catholic academy, in 2014 and rented the space to Mayor DeBlasio’s universal pre-K program.

But there is no ulterior motive behind the St. Agatha closure, a diocesan spokesman said.

“There aren’t any plans for the property at this time,” said Vito Formica. “The decision to close the school was not made with haste. This was carefully reviewed and it is the finances that led to this decision.”

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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[DOWNTOWN] Closed borders, bodegas: Yemeni workers protest ‘Muslim ban’

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Caroline Spivack

Brooklyn Daily

Talk about bodega heroes!

Yemeni deli workers protesting President Trump’s “Muslim ban” went on strike on Thursday and flooded Borough Hall Plaza, carrying flags from Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen — and plenty of Old Glory. They were showing their dedication to the American dream, said one business owner.

“We are here to stay. We are the fabric of our communities, our city, and our country. People depend on us and our businesses, and we deserve to be here, our families deserve to come here, and we deserve respect.,” said Ahmed Abboud, who closed his Bay Ridge bodega earlier in the day and came down with his brothers and staff.

President Trump’s order suspends all refugee admissions for 120 days and blocks citizens of the seven countries from entering the U.S. for 90 days, except legal permanent residents.

Demonstrators packed in hours before the 5 pm kick-off, chanting “No ban, no wall, NYC for all” and “We stand together.” The rally began with an Islamic prayer followed by remarks from a slew of local pols and community activists urging solidarity.

“We are all Muslim today,” said Borough President Adams. “You have the right to your American dream. And to be part of what America stands for. And this sends a loud and clear message.”

Many at the rally said they have been in the U.S. for decades. But some were newer arrivals who came a few years ago fleeing political instability — only to jump out of one frying pan and into another.

The section of Bay Ridge jokingly called “Bay Root” for its sizable Middle Eastern community was a ghost town Thursday afternoon. More than a dozen Fifth Avenues businesses went dark for the rally, many of which with signs plastered in their storefront that read, “Refugees and Immigrants are welcome here. No Muslim ban. No border wall. Our communities stand tall.”

Taking a hit at the cash register was worth it to make a statement, one store owner said.

“I don’t even care that this is costing me,” said Hussein Bahar who co-owns a bodega with his brother in Sunset Park. “This is too important not to. How can I stay at home and not come out and defend myself? The people need to know we are upset.”

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at mspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.

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[COURTS] Here’s why El Chapo isn’t being held in Brooklyn

Note: More media content is available for this story at BrooklynDaily.com.

By Max Jaeger

Brooklyn Daily

Brooklyn can’t hold El Chapo.

That’s the message the Feds sent when they decided to keep slippery Sinaloa drug cartel kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman in a Manhattan lockup rather than a Brooklyn jail — even though he’s standing trial in Downtown Brooklyn’s federal court on a blockbuster, 17-count international drug-trafficking indictment.

Then again, Sunset Park’s Metropolitan Detention Center — where El Chapo would likely have stayed had he been kept in the Borough of Kings — may not be the best place for an escape-artist who bribed guards to roll him out of Mexican jail in a laundry cart and later escaped another south-of-the-border lockup via a mile-long tunnel, according to an ex-con who did time in the Brooklyn detention center twice and said the jailhouse is full of security holes.

“For the New York dudes that did time there, they always spoke very highly — it’s sweet, wide open,” said Seth Ferranti, a jailbird-turned-author who did a pair of two-week stints in Brooklyn while in transit between prisons in the 1990s. “It’s a lot of activity of people coming in and out — so there’s a lot of hustling.”

Contraband, that is.

That was back in the rough-and-tumble ’90s, but the high-security behemoth is apparently quite accommodating, even nowadays.

Notorious convicted cop-killer Ronell Wilson knocked up his guard after multiple trysts while doing time in 2013, and Brooklyn Federal judge Nicholas Garaufis ordered a formal investigation into the Sunset Park slammer after determining Wilson was “permitted to treat the MDC as his own private fiefdom.”

Reps from the Federal Bureau of Prisons, which runs the detention center, say they have tightened security.

“In order to mitigate life-endangering consequences of dangerous contraband introduction for both staff and inmates, including cellphones, weapons, and narcotics, BOP has deployed a number of new strategies and enhanced existing practices,” spokesman Justin Long said.

But even if the jail’s guards were impregnable, the ground it sits on is not.

Feds crowed that El Chapo will “face American justice in a city that’s foundation is bedrock,” during a press conference announcing his extradition to the U.S.

That’s true for the Manhattan lock-up — but Sunset Park sits atop a squishy mix of dirt and rocks deposited there by a glacier 15,000 years ago — not the tough-as-nails bedrock that Manhattan sits on, according to a local geologist.

“Manhattan bedrock extends into Brooklyn, but that’s up more toward Flatbush Avenue Extension,” said Brooklyn College chief geology lab tech Guillermo Rocha.

The earth beneath Brooklyn’s jail at Second Avenue and 30th Street — a two-minute walk from the Gowanus Bay — is all “sediment and boulders,” he said.

A judge recently ruled that the kingpin could physically come to the Kings County courthouse, which will likely require the temporary, partial closure of the Brooklyn Bridge while U.S. Marshals transport him to and from trial.

Reach deputy editor Max Jaeger at mjaeger@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–8303. Follow him on Twitter @JustTheMax.

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